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Suraj Shrestha

M.Sc. from the Central Department of Hydrology and Meteorology, Tribhuvan University, and Ph.D. in Physical Geography (Hydrology) from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ITPCAS) Beijing, China
Suraj Shrestha is a visiting faculty in the Central Department of Hydrology and Meteorology, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal. He received M.Sc. from the Central Department of Hydrology and Meteorology, Tribhuvan University, and Ph.D. in Physical Geography (Hydrology) from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ITPCAS) Beijing, China, in the year 2019. His research interests are in climate change, hydrology and its modeling and he has published research articles in national and international journals. He has more than 10 years of experience in conducting hydro-meteorological measurements in Nepal. As a researcher and teacher, he has participated in countless field campaigns for high- and low flow measurements, glacier mass balance measurements and meteorological station maintenance in rough terrain. In his student years, he has also worked as a trekking guide in Nepal where he has acquired exceptional language skills (English, Spanish) and excellent knowledge of the country’s people and remote corners.

Research Area

Climate change

Climate change is not a cup of tea that everyone wants to have it every day. Directly or indirectly it is affecting every living thing on the earth. Any changes in atmospheric phenomenon will alter the climate and hence affects the hydrological cycle. As hydrological cycle is a continuous or never-ending process of water between the earth and the atmosphere, it plays a vital role in climate system. Similarly, hydrological cycle in mountainous regions is not different but likely to change. Most studies emphasized the role of high mountain areas of the world as an important source of freshwater. But these regions are vulnerable to climate change and are likely to get a wide range of effects.
In high mountains, glaciers are taken as a source of water as it refills runoff in dry periods, which has been rapid due to warming climate-altering the current streamflow regimes. Snow and glaciers are sensitive to climate change, their contribution to river runoff is variable. Given the robust effects of climate change, scientists have given more effort to estimating the meltwater contribution to river runoff. Furthermore, many studies have been carried out across the Himalayas for monitoring glacial changes and found clear indications of glacial change.
It is thus of great interest to use hydrological model to improve knowledge of the response of Himalayan glaciers to climate change and their contributions to river runoff along with the relationship between the monsoon precipitation and meltwater in this region. Few studies on meltwater contribution using hydrological modeling were conducted on the Tibetan plateau including Himalayas. However, such studies are lacking on the transboundary river basins of the central Himalayas. Therefore, there is a need to conduct scientific studies on the transboundary river basins of the central Himalayas.